Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods, Part 1

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Iftar of Ramadan C1 During Ramadan – the month of prayer, abstinence, self-reflection and kindness, which begins this year in April – Muslims fast from dawn to dusk and stop eating and drinking, including water, until the time of the evening call to prayer at sunset. The daily fast is then broken with a meal called Iftar, which usually begins with dates and water. Eating after prayer is a time to connect with family, community and culture around the kitchen that cooks very slowly in some homes. From delicious Moroccan soups and healthy Bedouin-style decorations to Indonesian cuisinelane Here are some of the most delicious Iftar dishes in the world from all over the world to try this Ramadan.

Iftar is the time to connect with family, community and culture around the home-cooked kitchen, and sometimes family recipes are used that follow specific customs and traditions..

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods

1. Middle East: Lentil soup

For many Muslims in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, iftar begins with a cup of lentil soup, served with toast and lemon. Cooking red lentils with different vegetables like carrots, onions, potatoes and a specific group of spices like turmeric, cumin, cinnamon and parsley (the exact mix depends on where you are in the Middle East), lentil soup is rich in protein and nutrients especially after the fasting period.

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods

2. Morocco: Harira

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods, Part 1

Usually served with dates, this delicious soup takes its name from the Arabic word “hariri”. In Morocco, the best quality lentils, chickpeas, meat and vermicelli are served in a rich tomato soup, which usually starts boiling in the kitchen late in the afternoon. Its creamy texture comes from the spin It is a thick mixture of flour and water that is added stirring the soup. Each family prepares the dish differently, with some choosing rice instead of vermicelli or beef instead of lamb; The balance of herbs and spices is also different – cinnamon, turmeric, saffron, cumin, coriander, parsley, celery, ginger. Fasters are also inclined to eat chebakia, which is a cake with sesame and honey.

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods

3. India and Pakistan: Shami Kebab

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods, Part 1

On Ramadan evenings in India and Pakistan, the air is filled with the tempting aroma of delicious handkerchief kebabs, cardamom spices, while locals gather around crowded stalls on the street to see this delicious snack. The origin of melted sheep noodles in the mouth is believed to be in the city of Lucknow. It is believed that they first prepared for a ruler of India who had a dental problem in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Kebab consists of lamb or beef cooked with chana dal or Bengali gram, ground and seasoned with garlic, ginger, cinnamon, pepper, cloves, cumin, mint, coriander and green peppers. Dip in eggs and fry superficially until crispy on the outside and almost crushed on the inside. Served with mint chutney, coriander, ketchup and onion bracelets.

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods

4. Emirates: Al-Harees

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods, Part 1

Emirati families try to present the best and most delicious dishes in Ramadan, the most important of which is Harees, an ancient dish consisting mainly of lamb or chicken with wheat, which you will also find in the kitchens of other Gulf countries. The wheat is soaked overnight before cooking and then slowly boiled with the meat on the bone for four hours or more. The meat is then detached from the bones, cut and mixed again with the wheat. Traditionally, it was pressed with a large wooden spoon to create a clear sticky consistency, but in many modern kitchens, a food processor is used, which significantly reduces time and effort. At the end the dish is covered with ghee and fried onions.

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods

5. Saudi Arabia: Al Thareed

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods, Part 1

Breakfast in Saudi Arabia will certainly include porridge, a rich lamb and vegetable stew. Some consider it as one of the favorite dishes of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him, and it has a great cultural significance in the region. To prepare the dish, the lamb is boiled for more than an hour, then it is added to the potatoes, carrots and zucchini and boiled in tomato paste, onion and garlic, together with the meat juice. Seasoned with turmeric, dried lemon, cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, red pepper and pepper, the soup is served on layers of soaked tortillas (thin flat bread).

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods

6. South Asia: Samos

Ramadan Cuisine: 12 Traditional Ramadan Iftar Foods, Part 1

A favorite throughout South Asia, samosas are usually stuffed with either mashed potatoes or minced meat seasoned with cumin, coriander and hot spices. Keema samosas stuffed with minced lamb – served with mint chutney, coriander and a delicious tamarind chutney – are especially popular during Ramadan. Thought of Persian origin, this versatile snack can be fried or baked and fits flavors and extra fillings like sliced ​​cheese, spinach or minced meat. Regional variations include samosas from Central Asia and samosas from the Middle East.

Read also:

Ramadan Soups 2022 are easy to prepare to start your Iftar

Ramadan Salads 2022 are easy to prepare, suitable for iftar and suhoor

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